Classic Cars' Museum: Class A Antique



Concours d'Elegance 2010: Class A Antique





1907 Chadwick Model 16 7 Passenger Touring

1907 Chadwick Model 16 7 Passenger Touring
Once a name rivaled by only the most elite automobiles in the world, Chadwick has nearly slipped into extinction over the past century. In a period od countless automobile companies being found around the country, few, if any, could compare with Chadwick's size quality and technology at such an early date. not only were many of the engine designs patented, it was Chadwick that first poineered superchargers, equipping them to their race cars as early as 1909. This Model 16 features the famous Great Chadwick Six, displacing 707 cubic inches and capable of propelling a bare chassis to over 100 miles per hour. Only one pair of original Chadwicks are known to exist and this example still wears its original 7-passenger bodywork.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1906 Winton Model K Touring

1906 Winton Model K Touring
Alexander Winton built his first American automobile in 1896. His advertisements carried the slogan "Dispense with a Horse!" From the very beginning Winton knew that racing was the key to selling his automobiles. He first raced the clock at the Glenville track in Cleveland, then tried several other road races from Cleveland to New York. The Winton Racers were driven by Winton, Barney Oldfield and Earl H. Kiser. By 1905 Winton had blazed the trail of the American-built race car and had proved that the Winton automobile was one of the best. At this point, his focus shifted from racing to promoting his new Model K Touring car. Using the same 4-cylinder 40 hp engine from the successful race car, the Winton Bullet No. 3, the Model K led to his most successful motor car, the Wonton Six.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1913 Peerless 48 Kimbell Town Car

1913 Peerless 48 Kimbell Town Car
Peerless Motor Company began building motorcars in 1900; along with Packard and Pierce-Arrow it was known as one of the "Three P's of motordom." In 1912 General Electric Corporation secured control of the company, and thereafter, electric lights and electric starters were standard on all models. With the introduction of the electric starter, Peerless was able to increase the size of its six cylinder engines. This six cylinder, 48 hp Town Car would have sold for around $7,000 in 1913. C.P. Kimball & Co. of Chicago built this large and luxurious town car body. The Kimball family had started a wheelwright and carriage business in 1634, and nine generations of the family had been involved in the trade before the company folded in 1929. Kimball is therefore considered to be America's first coachbuilder.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1913 American Underslung Traveler Type 56A 7 Passenger Touring

1913 American Underslung Traveler Type 56A 7 Passenger Touring
The American Motor Car Company of Indianapolis offered the unusual choice of a conventionally sprung chassis or an innovative "underslung" setup beginning in 1907. The latter placed the frame rails under the front and rear axles to move the mass of the engine and transmission closer to the ground and lower the center of gravity. The engine and body were mounted within the frame rails rather than on top. Massive wheels-up to 40 inches-provided ground clearance. In 1912 the company changed its name to American Underslung and this 7 passenger Touring model was introduced with a six-cylinder engine. Period advertising referred to the car as "America's Most Luxurious Car," and it was priced at well over $4,000 (around $85,000 today).
Source: classiccarslog.com





1910 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost Double Pullman Limousine

1910 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost Double Pullman Limousine
This magnificent and incredibly tall 1910 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost Double Pullman Limousine remains in its original condition. The car was founded in the mid-1950s on a remote part of the Black Isle in Scotland, locked up in a dark building. Other than a patch of paint faded by a stream of light from a small window, the Ghost returned to the real world unaltered by its long incarceration. It has been nicknamed the "Mary Rose," which is the name taken from a short story by J.M. Barrie about the strange disappearance of a little girl on a tiny Hebridean island who reappears to her parents, unaged and unchanged many years later. Since being discovered, only sympathetic maintenance has been carried out to maintain the car's originality. The paintwork shows the true art of the original coach painter; amazingly the painter's original brush strokes are still visible.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1911 Stoddard-Dayton Model 11K Semi-Torpedo

1911 Stoddard-Dayton Model 11K Semi-Torpedo
The stoddard-Dayton was a very high quality motorcar manufactured by the Dayton Motor Car Company in Dayton, Ohio between 1905 and 1913. The company adopted a strategy of building the very best cars with powerful engines. Henry J. Edwards, the chief engineer of the company, introduced many new inventions, like inclined valves with a single camshaft and hemospherical combustion chambers - improvements that were far ahead of their time. A car similar to this Model 11K was driven at the first race held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. All Stoddard-Daytons were beautifully built, even the low-end models were dressed in 15 to 18 coats of paint, each coat hand-sanded and rubbed out. The top of the range limousines had 27 or 28 coats of paint, similarly applied.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1914 Packard 38 5 Passenger Phaeton

1914 Packard 38 5 Passenger Phaeton
Packard Company was very successful with the production of its early four-cylinder cars and by 1912 it began production of the six-cylinder range. A total of 14 different body styles were offered, including this Phaeton. Parkard owners could also choose from over 40 different paint styles in a range of attractive single and two-tone color shcemes, and this olive green and black is typical of the era. This Packard 38 has a T-head six-cylinder engine developing a healthy 82 bhp at 1,720 rpm. The 38 was known to be one of the smoothest running cars of its day - an experience made possible by a number of mechanical refinements, including a sliding gear transmission and a complicated shaft drive through spiral bevel gears.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1902 Mercedes Simplex 28 HP Tourer

1902 Mercedes Simplex 28 HP Tourer
This is the oldest road-going automobile in the world to bear the Mercedes name. This Mercedes Simplex 28 HP Tourer is the model that immediately followed the first "real" automobile as we know it today, the 35 HP Mercedes designed by Wilhelm Maybach. Austrian businessman Emil Jellinek was passionate about technical progress and the newly invented motorcar. In March 1900, under the pseudonmy of Monsieur "Mercedes," the name of his daughter, and with the support of the Daimler-Motoren-Gesellschaft (DMG) he entered two Daimler "Phoneix" racing cars with 28 HP engines in Nice race week. He soon ordered a whole series of cars to be designed by Maybach at DMG with the 28 HP engine and these he called Mercedes-Somplex due to their simple, yet beautifully designed engineering. One of the features of the Maybach design was the new honeycomb radiator that continues to this day.
Source: classiccarslog.com




Press any key for more pictures.