Classic Cars' Museum: Class B Vintage



Concours d'Elegance 2010: Class B Vintage





1921 Renault Labourdette Skiff

1921 Renault Labourdette Skiff
In the mid 1920s, Carrosserie Henri Labourdette built several torpedo skiffs on small Renault chassis. This car is believed to be the only Labourdette short chassis "boattail" to survive. Mahogany was used not just for the deck, dash and floors, but also for the internal structure of the body. In general, these skiffs cost several times the cost of a completed Renault factory car with more lavish touring style coachwork. Well-healed owners of large chassis custom-bodied cars could now own a self-driven runabout built with the same flair as their chauffeur-driven Rolls-Royce or Hispano-Suiza. This 950 cc 4-cylinder 6CV Renault with its stylish trademark front end boasts the signature Labourdette flying wings. Marchal headlamps and three seat configuration. It is typical of the French design style that still exists to this day at Renault.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1921 Heine-Velox Sporting Victoria

1921 Heine-Velox Sporting Victoria
German-born Gustav Henie cam to California with his family in 1873. He worked for a piano manufacturer in San Francisco but was always fascinated by engineering, and he built his first three cars, all 50 to 60 hp runabouts, in 1906. After the San Francisco earthquake he moved to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and in 1921 he bought the Economy Steel Manufacturing Company and began building the Heine Velox--a handmade luxury car on a huge low frame with a 148-inch wheelbase. It had hydraulic brakes on all wheels, a cold weather starting system and pivoting windows. Its massive frame was powered by a Weidely V12 engine build in Indianapolis. The most expensive car in America in its day, the Heine-Velox Sproting Victoria caot $25,000 in 1921 when other luxury cars, including Rolls-Royce, were selling for under $10,000. Very few Heine-Velox cars were built and only two are known to survive.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1922 Duesenberg A Millspaugh & Irish Sport Pheaton

1922 Duesenberg A Millspaugh & Irish Sport Pheaton
In 1913 Fred and August Duesenberg opened a small plant in St. Paul, Minnesota, where they built racing cars as well as marine and aircraft engines during World War I. in 1920 they began produceing automobiles under their own name, the Duesenberg Automobile and Motors Company in Indianapolis, Indiana. From the beginning, Duesenbergs had a straight-eight engine with a single overhead camshaft and hydraulic four-wheel brakes - both firsts in an American production automobile. Coachwork from Fleetwood, Rubay, Murphy, and Millspaugh & irish (the latter of which was responsible for this example) were ordered for the Model A chassis. The Model A was the foundation of the company and earned the enviable reputation for Duesenberg that would help coin the phrase "She's a real Duesy" to refer to anything supremely desirable and the best of its kind.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1919 Meisenhelder 6-55 Runabout

1919 Meisenhelder 6-55 Runabout
Roy Meisenhelder of York, pennsylvania, built this one-off automobile between 1919 and 1920. It is largely based on a Paige Model 6-40 roadster chassis and an 82 hp, six-cylinder Continental engine. A sheet-metal worker by profession, Meisenhelder formed the body and incorporated two rather precarious "jump-seats" on the running boards aswell as huge aluminum castings to hold a luggage trunk. Roy kept the car until he passed away in 1955. It is adorned with gadgets and refinements, including a stylish split windsheild, side lamps over the turned-up running boards, and an air vent in the cowl. The polished dise wheels ass to its unique period style. During the 1920s many individuals built their won automobiles but few of these cars remain in great condition.
Source: classiccarslog.com





192 Mercer Series 5 Raceabout

192 Mercer Series 5 Raceabout
First built in 1911, Mercer's Raceabout, with its thundering four-cylinder engine, round bolster fuel tank, monocle windshield and simple seating for its driver and one brace passenger, was the first production automobilesuccessfully built for the sole purpose of going fast and winning races. Between 1911 and 1915 the Roebling brothers and their engineer Finley Robertson Porter built around 800 Raceaboutm which their customers could take straight from the factory to the race track. it is often credited as being America's first sports car. Over ten years the Raceabout was developed improved and by 1922 the Series 5 sported much improved bodywork with side panels and enclosed fenders to protect its ossupants. This example remains in largely original condition, even retaining its original upholstery.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1920 Mercer Series 5 Sporting

1920 Mercer Series 5 Sporting
The reputation and fame of the Mercer Mortor Automobile Company of Trenton, New Jersey, is largely based on its raceabout model, which set numerous speed records between 1911 and 1914. Mercer also manufactured other high quality, hand-built cars, including a four-passenger touring model that became the "Sporting" in 1915. This Series 5 Mercer has a four-cylinder L-head engine with four speed transmission delivering over 70 hp. This is one of about 4,000 Mercer built with the L-head enging, but only about 60 are known to exist today. The Mercer Company would have been 100 years old this year; it began in 1910 and continued through 1925. Never produced in hgigh numbers, Mercer were rather exclusive and rather expensive-the first Mercer sold for $1,950 in 1910.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1924 Kissel 6-55

1924 Kissel 6-55 "Gold Bug" Speedster
The Kissel Motor Car Company was founded by Louis Kissel and his sons, George and William, on June 5, 1906, in Hartford, Wisconsin. Often called "Kissel Kars," just 150 automobiles are known to remain of the 35,000 they produced. The two-passenger "Gold Bug" Speedster models were owned by many rich and famous personalities of the tiem, including actor Fatty Arbuckle and aviatrix Amelia Earhart. The 1924 6-55 Speedster was first exported to an Australian mill owner. it spent all its life in Queensland, some of it working as a utility vehicle on a farm, until Lynn and Jeanne Kissel bought the car in 2005 and returned it to California for a full restoration.
Source: classiccarslog.com




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