Classic Cars' Museum: Class D-1 Pierce-Arrow through 1919



Concours d'Elegance 2010: Class D-1 Pierce-Arrow through 1919





1924 Pierce-Arrow 33 4 Passenger Phaeton

1924 Pierce-Arrow 33 4 Passenger Phaeton
About 6,000 of the Pierce-Arrow Series 33 cars were produced during the five years they were on sale. Prices for the Series 33 were expensive, ranging from $6,500 to $8,500 depending on body style. As with earlier Pierce-Arrow, the luxury and attention to detail was very evident. The radiator shell and most other brignt work was solid German Silver. The heart of the Series 33 was the dual-valve 6-cylinder T-Head engine. The Series 33 defined elegance for the top-of-the-ine Pierce-Arrow through the first half of the 1920s and was replaced by the redesigned Series 36 in 1927. A feature of Pierce-Arrows are the headlights that bulge from the fenders, as first seen on this model. This car was once owned by the service representative for Pierce-Arrow, Sterling "Fussy" Whitacher.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1919 Pierce-Arrow 51-C Coupe

1919 Pierce-Arrow 51-C Coupe
The 1919 Pierce-Arrow Model 51 with its dual-valve 6-cylinder engine was the company's replacement for the Model 66 with its massive 824-cubic-inch engine, which was one of the largest production automobile engines ever manufactured. Model 51s were often built with large limousine style coachwork. When President Woodrow Wilson returned from France after negotiating the Treaty of Versailles in 1919, a new Pierce-Arrow Model 51 limousine was waiting for him at the dock in New York to take him back to the White House in Washington. This smaller Pierce-Arrow 51C with a factory built coupe body has a very stylish curved-glass 3-piece windshield. It has never been restored and still wears its original paint. Its current owner found the car in 1996.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1918 Pierce-Arrow 48-B-5 4 Passenger Touring

1918 Pierce-Arrow 48-B-5 4 Passenger Touring
1918 was a traditional year for Pierce-Arrow, with the debut of the Series 5 cars. These cars retained many of the design features of earlier models, suc as cowl lights and vents in the top of the hood, but saw the introduction of an improved 48 horsepower engine with four valves per cylinder instead of two, resulting in increased performance. This 4 Passenger Touring was one of V's most sporting touring bodies. This illusion was given by the lower-cut sides of the body and the absence of the "belt molding" along the top of the doors. This car also featrues rear mounted spare tires, which were normally affixed to the driver's side running board. As expected, this option could be special ordered as Pierce-Arrow rarely denied a suctomer's request.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1918 Pierce-Arrow 66 Prototype 7 Passenger Touring

1918 Pierce-Arrow 66 Prototype 7 Passenger Touring
Few car companies enjoyed the same success over the same long period that Pierce-Arrow did before 1920. In 1918, Pierce-Arrow increased its stake as the premier luxury American carmaker by introducing a new 66 horsepower engine. It retained the same colossal 825-cubic-inch displacement and 6-cylinders as prior models, but increased the power with 4 valves oer cylinder. The "dual-valve 66" was also the first American car to feature four-wheel brackes. Only four prototype cars were built with this new engine and were reportedly sent to dealers as demonstrators. This 7 passenger touring is the only surviving example of the four dual-valve 66 Prototypes.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1918 Pierce-Arrow 48-B-5 Convertible Coupe

1918 Pierce-Arrow 48-B-5 Convertible Coupe
Like all the very best luxury automobile manufacturers, Pierce-Arrow offered several distinct yet seemingly redundant body styles. In 1918, no less than fourteen body styles were offered on the 48 chassis, with additional custom bodies available to discerning customers who were not content with this selection. This very unique Pierce-Arrow is believed to be the only one extant with a Convertible Coupe body on the 48 horsepower chassis. It was the only open body with roll-up windows availabe in the Pierce-Arrow catalogue. This car also features optional, detached headlights in place of Pierce-Arrow's trademark fender-molded headlights, which were adopted in 1914. The detached headlights are often referred to as "New York headlights" because New York had outlawed fender-mounted headlights, which was especially ironic since Pierce-Arrows were built in Buffalo, New York.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1915 Pierce-Arrow 38-C-3 Kimball Town Car

1915 Pierce-Arrow 38-C-3 Kimball Town Car
Pierce-Arrows were often the subject of custom bodies as requested by the marque's affluent and demanding customers. It was said a customer could get virtually anything he or she could afford and the company promoted custom body styles. This very unique Town Car was built by coachbuilder Kimball for its original owner, mrs. William K. Vanderbilt. It is a testament to the quality of this car that it was owned by the wife of the famously wealthy Willie K. Vanderbilt, founder of the Vanderbilt Cup Races and an unmatched automobile enthusiast. This custom Town Car remains largely original, displaying the opulent interior that Kimball created for it in 1915. Its preservation is a tribute to the three carefull and knowledgeable owners it has had in its 95-year existence.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1915 Pierce-Arrow 66-A-3 7 Passenger Touring

1915 Pierce-Arrow 66-A-3 7 Passenger Touring
Pierce-Arrow was always one of the most opulent and expensive luxury cars built in America, but with the introduction of the 66-horsepower model, it moved into a class that was nearly unmatched. The 66 featured an 825-cubic-inch, six-cylinder engine, the largest engine ever installed in a production car - a record shared with Peerless Automobiles that still stands today as noted in the Guinness Book of World Records. Along with the enormous engine, every part of the driveline of a 66 is of larger scale than the other models, giving a true example of how Pierce-Arrow set out to build the best automobile of the era. this 66 7 passenger touring is a quintessential example of not only Pierce-Arrow's grandest model, but also their most popular open car body, the ubiquitous 7 passenger touring.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1913 Pierce-Arrow 38-C Runabout

1913 Pierce-Arrow 38-C Runabout
had several new features in 1913, most notably the introduction of standard nickel trim in place of brass and an air starter system in which compressed air was pumped into the cylinders to move the postons and turn the engine. This Runabout was sold new in San Francisco to a wealthy Hillsborough lumber baron who had the spare tire mounted on the rear deck so the car could carry more sporting equipment on the running boards. this Runabout, seen in its orginal colors, has never left Bay Area ownership; it has had just three owners in its 97-year histroy.
Source: classiccarslog.com




Press any key for more pictures.