Classic Cars' Museum: Class G Duesenberg



Concours d'Elegance 2010: Class G Duesenberg





1930 Duesenberg J Graber Cabriolet

1930 Duesenberg J Graber Cabriolet
This Duesenberg Model J was originally delivered to its New York owner with a Murphy Town Car body in 1930. After moving to France, its owner sold it to the Paris Duesenberg agent E.Z. Sadovich, who commissioned this body by Graber in 1934. Of the various Swiss coachbuilders, Carrosserie Graber is undoubtedly the most well known and successful. This was the third Duesenberg to be rebodied in period by Graber and is considered to be their most successful design. It is also the only Graber-bodied Duesenberg still in existence today. Graber shortened the chassis to standard Duesenberg short chassis length and built all but the center section of the body out of aluminum. Unlike most luxury cars of the period, the interior is relatively Spartan; to save weight a lot of the trim is painted aluminum. Graber built very similar coachwork on a Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 as well as a Packard chassis.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1929 Duesenberg J Murphy Sport Phaeton

1929 Duesenberg J Murphy Sport Phaeton
One of just three Dual Cowl Murphy-bodied Phaetons, this Duesenberg Model J is a very raer motorcar. The Murphy company was the most popular choice to add coachwork to the fabulous Duesenberg chassis, but each and every Model J was made to meet the specific needs of a customer. The Model J Duesenberg has long been regarded as the most outstanding example of design and engineering of the classic era. Its 1929 introduction was so momentous that trading was halted on the New York Stock exchange for the announcement. At $8,500 for the chassis alone, it was by far the most expensive car in America. With coachwork, the delivered price of many Duesenbergs approached $20,000, a staggering sum at a time when a typical new family car most around $500.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1929 Duesenberg J LeBaron Sport Phaeton

1929 Duesenberg J LeBaron Sport Phaeton
Introduced at the December 1928 New York Automobile Salon the Duesenberg Model J quickly established itself as the undisputed heavyweight champion of the luxury grand tourer world. The LeBaron Dual Cowl Phaeton was one of the best and most luxurious bodies that could be built upon this chassis. LeBaron Carrossiers was founded in 1920 by Thomas L. Hibbard and Raymond Dietrich in New York city. They chose the LeBaron name because it sounded French and would lend a sophisticated air. They also chose to have only a design office, without coachbuilding facilities. This changed in 1927 when the company merged with the Briggs coachbuilding company and began building bodies. The chief designer of this and many other Duesenberg Js was John Tjaarda, father of Tom Tjaarda, who is a renowned designer in his own right - and an Honorary Judge on our show field today.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1930 Duesenberg J Murphy Town Car

1930 Duesenberg J Murphy Town Car
This Duesenberg Model J Town Car with coachwork by Murphy is one of only four Town Cars like it in the world. Many similar cars have heavy, conservative styling but Murphy's famous trademark styling touches like the very thin windshield pillars make this car very unusual. The Walter M. Murphy Company of Pasadena, California bodied more Duesenberg Js than any other coachbuilder, and the Murphy designs show why: the combination of balance, proportion, color, hardware, finish and materials perfectly complement the Model J's power, prestige and performance. In its design, the Model J chassis was very simple with a ladder frame and solid axles front and rear. An ingenious lubrication system was installed, which automatically started lubricating various parts of the chassis after sixty to eighty miles.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1934 Duesenberg SJ LeBaron Convertible Berline

1934 Duesenberg SJ LeBaron Convertible Berline
The first Duesenberg Model J was announced in 1928, just two years after the company had been purchased by E. L. Cord in1926. The heart of the model J is its straight-eight engine, which develops 265 bhp in standard form. This automobile (engine number J-494) is fitted with the optional supercharger, bringing the engine up to 320 bhp. These supercharge Duesenbergs, known as SJs, have tremendous torque: speeds between 3 and 100 mph can all be achieved while in the top gear. This supercharged car is fitted with a convertible sedan body from the coachbuilding firm of LeBaron, founded by Thomas Hibbard and Raymond Dietrich. LeBaron is believed to have built eight of these sedans on both long and short wheelbase chassis. This is one of three known to survive.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1934 Duesenberg J Rollston Town Car

1934 Duesenberg J Rollston Town Car
Once the property of a Chicago "businessman", this Duesenberg J led a rather exciting early life before its owner sold it in the mid 1950s. One can imagine the various "business meetings" that the car attended during its time in Chicago! It has been cared for by its current owner since 1959 and has been thoughtfully preserved ever since. A regular attendee at the many Auburn, Cord, Duesenberg events over the years, it has won many awards. The New York City coachbuilder Rollston that sipplied this Town Car body was acknowledged as building some of the strongest bodywork of the classis-era and used only the best materials and castings. Rollston built 57 bodies for the magnificant Duesenberg Model J and JN, including 15 Town Cars.
Source: classiccarslog.com




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