Classic Cars' Museum: Class H Rolls-Royce



Concours d'Elegance 2010: Class H Rolls-Royce





1935 Rolls-Royce Phantom II All Weather Drophead Coupe

1935 Rolls-Royce Phantom II All Weather Drophead Coupe
This Rolls-Royce Phantom II (107 TA) was ordered by Mr. A Simpson of London, who contracted with the All-Weather Bodies Cmpany there to construct a Drop Head Coupe intended for high speed touring in the United Kingdom and Europe. The factory build sheets indicate that the chassis was to be eqipped with the following: six Dunlop Fort Silent Tread Tires on four 7-19 inch Dunlop wire wheels and two spare wheels. The unique body style on this PII has a very long hood line and elegant drophead coupe coachwork. Its coachwork combines some of the best features of the era, particularly the sweeping fenders, hood side louvers, low profile tilt-out windscreen, and passenger compartment set well back.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1921 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost Pall Mall Tourer

1921 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost Pall Mall Tourer
This car is the earliest open Spring-built Rolls-Royce known to exist. In 1921, Rolls-Royce decided to build some motor cars in the United States, and it chose Springfield, Massachusetts, as its base. The location was chosen for its proximity to major northeastern markets and important suppliers as well as the supply of skilled craftsmen trained in the armories of the Connecticut River valley and the New England machine tool industry. the 40/50 horsepower Silver Ghosts were shipped from England and assembled in Springfield. this particular Springfield-built motor car was sold new in Los Angeles and was owned by a number of prominent people there before being purchased by the Bothwell family ans stored for over sixth years.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1939 Rolls-Royce Phantom III Gurney Nutting Saloon

1939 Rolls-Royce Phantom III Gurney Nutting Saloon
The first body on this Rolls-Royce Phantom III (chassis 3DL122) was a Barker-built saloon, but that body was exchanged by its then-owner, the Earl of Shrewsbury, for this Gurney Nutting saloon in 1953. In the early 1960s this car was owned by Tommy Atkins, a motor-racing team managerin England. In 1963 it was brought to Carmel, California, and in 1968 it was purchased by Ken and Kermie Karger, editors of the Rolls-Royce Owners Club magazine The Flying Lady. Over the years Mermie and her late husband carried out much restoration work and drove the car on many trips and adventures across America. With several owners in both the United Kingdom and the United States, including Harry Ferguson of four-wheel-drive fame, this PIII has led a very interesting life including being carried as deck cargo on the Aquitania on its last voyage across the Atlantic before World War II.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1930 Rolls-Royce Phantom II Brewster Trouville Town Car

1930 Rolls-Royce Phantom II Brewster Trouville Town Car
By 1930 Rolls-Royce of America was facing difficulties and the new Phantom II was only available from the Derby factory in the England. Adeline Bamberger of New York purchased the chassis in England and had it shopped to the United States to be fitted with Sedanca coachwork by Brewster. The Phantom II was the last of the great six cylinder Rolls-Royce motor cars to be supervised by Henry Royce himself. From 1930 to 1935 the Rolls-Royce Phantom Ii was built as a replacement to the original New Phantom of 1925, with a new chassis and a much-modified engine and transmission. Interestingly, the current owner of this car purchased it by accident on eBay when his son misunderstood his instructions to increase a bid on an Antique gas pump and ended up successfully bidding on this Rolls-Royce!
Source: classiccarslog.com





1934 Rolls-Royce Phantom OO Continental Thrupp & Maberly Roadster

1934 Rolls-Royce Phantom OO Continental Thrupp & Maberly Roadster
This Roll-Royce Phantom II Continental (chassis 2SK) motor car boasts the most unique coachwork ever built on a Phantom II. This is one of only two Phantom Iis with roadster bodies, and it is the only one with this particular design. It was constructed by Thrupp & Maberly for the Rt. hon. Sir Auckland Geddes, who was the British Ambassador to the united States in the 1920s. he was a sports car enthusiast who required a high-speed, sporting car for a European tour in 1934. In the mid-1950s this PII Continental was purchased by Tyronr Power for the same price as a Bugatti Royle. not widely regarded for their sporting characteristics, this Rolls-Royce is often referred to as the sportiest Rolls-Royce ever built.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1928 Rolls-Royce Phantom I

1928 Rolls-Royce Phantom I "Riviera" Brewster Town Car
After opening its new plant in Springfield, Massachusetts, the first Springfield-built Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost Chassis was delivered in 1921. The first left-hand-drive Rolls-Royce was built in 1925. In 1927 the Springfield factory introduced the New Phantom or Phantom I with a new 7,688 cc engine. At the same time, Rolls-Royce introduced a series of stylish designs by Brewster & Company, of Long Island City, new York, which have become some of the most attractive and sought after examples of classic Rolls-Royce coachwork. Brewster, owned by Rolls-Royce since 1925, supplied coachwork named after towns in England, such as Henley and York and the slightly obscure Croydon. Other names referred to continental locations, such as this Riviera Town Car, which was the heigh of style in the roaring twenties and is perfectly siuted to the long wheelbase of the Phantom I.
Source: classiccarslog.com




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