Classic Cars' Museum: Class J-1 European Classic 1928-1931



Concours d'Elegance 2010: Class J-1 European Classic 1928-1931





1929 Mercedes 630K Castagna Town Car

1929 Mercedes 630K Castagna Town Car
Affordable by only the wealthy, the Model 630K was produced in limited numbers, with only 267 being built between 1926 and 1932. Displacing 6.3 liters, the 630K's single-overhead-camshaft six-cylinder engine preduced 160 bhp with the Roots supercharger engaged, and in this specification the 630K could justifiably claim to be the world's most powerful production toruing car. Charles Murray of Tulsa, Oklahoma, a wealthy oilman and land develpoer, ordered this chassis in 1927 and had it shipped from the Stuttgart factory to the Castagna coachworks in Milan. The cost of the car was a staggering $28,000, almost five times the cost of the equivalent Fleetwood-bodied Cadillac! After living in Tulsa and New York, the car was sold to Charles Eads who restored it and won countless awards at M-BCA events.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1931 Bugatti Type 50 Roadster

1931 Bugatti Type 50 Roadster
The 1930 to 1933 Bugatti Type 50 is in essence a scaled-down sporting coupe version of the Type 46 Royale. The gearbox is in unit with the rear axle and the car has the large twin cam 5-liter eight-cylinder engine, which was perhaps based on the Miller racing engine. The Type 50 was a direct replacement for the Type 46, and very luxurious by any standard. There was a choice of two wheelbases and several different body styles. It sold in small numbers because of its high price. Aimed at the sporting motorist, it was designed as a high performance "daily-driver." A team of Bugatti Type 50s first ran at Le Mans in 1931 and continued for the next three years, when a Type 50 led the race for some time before retiring. Depending on the body style, a Type 50 could reach around 105 mph and had a zero to 60 time of under 8 seconds, an impressive figure for a 1930s sports car.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1931 Bugatti Type 40A Roadster

1931 Bugatti Type 40A Roadster
Bugatti launched the Type 40 model in 1926, aiming to replace the company's previous 16-valve Brescia touring model. The Type 40 used the 1.5-liter four-cylinder engine first used in some Type 37s, but slightly detuned with one Zenith or twin Solex carburetors and coil ignition. This engine could deliver around 60 bhp, a quite impressive figure if one considers the car's dimensions. The Type 40 was built with a standard 4-seat coupe body or a roadster body, like this particular Type 40A. The Type 40A shared its engine block with the Type 40 but displayed 1.6 liters. After about 30 cars were built with this chassis specification, the Type 40A was discontinued in 1930. This car (chassis 40904) is a late model and has been restored by marque expert Jim Stranberg.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1931 Delage D8 Chapron Victoria Coupe

1931 Delage D8 Chapron Victoria Coupe
To replace the large 6-liter DR and GL models at the top of their range, the Delage company preapred a new eight-cylinder engine for 1930. Designed by Maurice Gaultier to compete with the 8-cylinder Isotta-Fraschini, the new 8-cylinder engine was used in the new Delage D8 and the car became the company's most noteworthy design; it was often described as the "Rolls-Royce of French Cars." Unlike Louis Delage's earlier racing cars, the D8 focused on refine elegance. The Delage D8 was first shown at the 1929 Paris Auto Salon where La Journee Industrielle called it a "perfect model in every respect." Delage prepared many in-house body designs for the D8, but still offered a rolling chassis for discerning clientele. This rather formal Victoria Coupe was built by the French coachbuilder Henri Chapron and is quite unlike his aerodynamic coachworks found on later D8-120s.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1928 Bugatti Type 43 Pritchard & Demollin Roadster

1928 Bugatti Type 43 Pritchard & Demollin Roadster
The type 43 is as close as it gets to a road-going version of the most successful racing car ever, the type 35. In 1926 Bugatti introduced an updated version of the Type 35, the Type 35B, with a larger 8-cylinder, 2.3-liter supercharged engine. This engine was also used in their new road car, the Type 43. It featured larger brakes and a larger radiator also found in the Type 38 to make the Type 43 suitable for the road use. With it is racing car background it was only natural for the owners and even the factory to campaign the Type 43 in events like the Brooklands handicap. Identifying features incluse the alloy Grand Prix style wheels. just 160 examples of the Type 43 were built by the Bugatti factory and this example (chassis 43222) has unique two seater coachwork by Pritchard and Demollin; it is one of very few Bugatti bodies by the small Belgian coachbuilder.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1928 Lorraine-Dietrich B3-6 Decorvaia Sports Roadster

1928 Lorraine-Dietrich B3-6 Decorvaia Sports Roadster
The French Lorraine-Dietrich company built automobile and aircraft engines from 1896 until 1935. In 1919 Dietrich introduced a new model in two wheelbases, the A1-6 and B2-6, joined three years later by the B3-6, with either a short or long wheelbase. All used the same 3.445 cc sic-cylinder engine. A team of three Larraine-Dietrich B3-6s came in first, second and third at the 24 hours of Le Mans race in 1926. The winning car, driven by Robert Bloch & Andre Rossignol, averaged over 100 kilometers per hour. To celebrate their success at Le Mans, the company built several Le Mans style chassis and this is one of those motorcars with coachwork by the French coachbuilder DeCorvaia et Cie. The B3-6, nicknamed "the Silken Six," was famous for the quietness of the engine; like many French racing engines, such as Bugatti, it had no cooling fan to disturb the peace.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1929 Bentley Speed Six Park Ward Open Two Seater

1929 Bentley Speed Six Park Ward Open Two Seater
This is one of only eleven open Bentley Speed Sixes with its original body - a Park Ward boattail speedster with pontoon fenders. Park Ward of London started by producing bodies for the Rolls- Royce Silver Ghost and was a major supplier to Rolls-Royce and Bentley owners throughout the 1920s. Originally delivered to a Mr. Donald Hurt in 1929, this car is one of the 182 Bentley Speed Sixes built between 1926 and 1930. During its 80-year life the car had one other body - a sporty two-seat design built by Abbots of Surrey, England, and fitted to it just after the war. The orignial body, seen here, was fitted on another 1-litre Bentley for the same period, but it has now been reunited with its original chassis and is seen here for the first time, having just completed a thorough restoration.
Source: classiccarslog.com




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