Classic Cars' Museum: Class J-2 European Classic 1932-1936



Concours d'Elegance 2010: Class J-2 European Classic 1932-1936





1933 Delage D8S De Villars Roadster

1933 Delage D8S De Villars Roadster
In 1930, Delage added to its D8 range this sports version built on a short wheelbase lowered chassis with revised suspension. Externally, to make the S more aerodynamic, a new type of radiator shell was used, which required a special hood and firewall that made the D8S even more visually distinctive. The Autocar magazine tested the D8S at over 100 mph and it demonstrated a zero-to-sixty time of 15 seconds, similar to a supercharge Blower Bentley. A lightweight roadster model D8S set a record average speed of 109.619 mph over 24 hours at Montlhery. This D8S with de Villars Roadster coachwork graced the 1933 Salon de Paris at the Grand Palais. It was owned during the 1950s by the Grand Hotel Velasquez in Madrid and offered as transport to its more discerning guests.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1936 Bugatti Type 57 Graber Cabriolet

1936 Bugatti Type 57 Graber Cabriolet
At its launch, the Bugatti Type 57 was availabe in four body styles. Three of these body styles were named after mountain peaks in the Alps- the four-seater, two-door Ventoux, the four-door Galibier, and the two-door Stelvio convertible - and the fourth was the Atalante. Because the Type 57 had a slightly larger chassis compared to earlier models of similar engine size, there was a lot of flexibility to accommodate custom coachwork. To cater to their customers' individual needs Bugatti also supplied bare chassis to coachbuilders. The two-door Stelvio convertible was often built by French coachbuilders Gangloff, but Swiss specialist Hermann Graber provided the coachwork for this Type 57. During the 1930s Graber was famous for his beautiful convertible and coupe designs.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1935 Bugatti Type 57 James Young Drophead Coupe

1935 Bugatti Type 57 James Young Drophead Coupe
The Bugatti Type 57, designed by Jean Bugatti, was bodied by some of the finest coachbuilders in the world, but just 12 of the 710 original chassis built between 1934 and 1939 had coachwork by the James Young company. The Type 57 is powered by an eight-cylinder, 3.3-liter twin-cam engine. The Bugatti Type 57 is famous in part due to its ultra rare Type 57SC Atlantic cousin, but this James Young-bodied example is almost as rare. This example was owned for over 40 years by the same family, which ordered it from the British Bugatti importer Colonel Giles after seeing an example at the London Motor Show in 1934. Its second and current owner bought the car in 1977. Chassis 57236 was restored in the 1980s and has since been very well cared - and it still has all of its original fittings.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1936 Mercedes-Benz 500K Special Roadster

1936 Mercedes-Benz 500K Special Roadster
The Mercedes-Benz 500K was first exhibied at the 1934 Berlin Motor Show and it continued to be built until 1936. The 500 denotes the 5-liter engine and the K is for the kompressor or supercharger that was fitted to the sports roadster. The 500K has all around independent suspension with a double wishbone front axle and a double-joint swing axle at the rear, as world first. Consequently it was a more comfortable and better handling car than Mercedes' previous S/SS/SSK generation of roadsters from the 1920s. Most of the 500Ks were bodied at the Mercedes-Benz sindelfingen factory. The Mercedes-Benz 500K and the later 540K rank among the most elegant sports cars from the prewar era.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1933 Talbot AV 105 James Young 4 Seater Sports Tourer

1933 Talbot AV 105 James Young 4 Seater Sports Tourer
The British Talbot company was founded in 1903 by the Earl of Shrewsbury-Charles Chetwynd-Talbot and Adolphe Clement to sell French-built motorcars. The company branded its imported cars as Clement-Talbots and assembled their own models, which they called Talbots. In 1916, Swiss born Georges Roesch became chief engineer, and in the 1920s Talbot built a number of successful cars, including the 3-liter Talbot 105. In the 1930s, Roesch-designed Talbots enjoyed racing success with the Fox & Nicholl team at Le Mans and Brooklands. This Sports Tourer witj James Young coachwork is typical of the touring Talbots of the period. Having spent most of its life in England, the car arrived in the United States in 1969. Its current owner bought it in 1996 and has restored the car to its original specification.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1932 Bugatti Type 55 Open Sports Tourer

1932 Bugatti Type 55 Open Sports Tourer
The Type 55 is one of the finest sports cars of the 1930s. About 15 of the 38 Bugatti Type 55s were fitted with flamboyany Jean Bugatti-designed roadster or coupe coachwork, the classic roadster being considered by many cognocenti to be the most attractive sports car ever offered to the motoring public. The Type 55's 2,262 cc, supercharged, twin-cam, straight-eight engine was carried over in detuned form from the successful Type 51 Grand Prix car and fitted to a modified Type 54 ladder frame chassis. It was the ultimate exclusive supercar of the early 1930s. Its closest rival, the 8C Alfa Romeo, sold in far greater numbers. This car was delivered new to Madame Saquier of Paris and after restoration was owned by Ralph Lauren until 2003. Its present owner bought the car from collector Bill Ainscough in 2005.
Source: classiccarslog.com




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