Classic Cars' Museum: Class J-3 European Classic 1937-1939



Concours d'Elegance 2010: Class J-3 European Classic 1937-1939





1939 Lagonda V12 Rapide Open Tourer

1939 Lagonda V12 Rapide Open Tourer
The British Lagonda company was started by an American, Wilbur Gunn, in 1899. After building motorcycles, he built his first car in 1905. The Lagonda V12 was first seen at the 1937 London Motor Show, and production started at the beginning of 1938. The V12 was designed by W.O. Bentley, who led a team of Lagonda engineers after the demise of Bentley Motors. The V12, 4.5-liter engine was fitted to three different chassis according to the sort of body required. All could do over 100 mph, and the lighter ones considerably more. Most were fitted with graceful touring bodies, but there were some sporty models and a team of competition cars that finished and second in class at Le Mans in 1939. Bombs demolished the Lagonda factory during the World War II, and the company could not survive the postwar years; it was bought by David Brown's Aston Martin company in 1947.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1939 Lagonda V12 Rapide Convertible

1939 Lagonda V12 Rapide Convertible
Founded in England in 1899 by American Wilbur Gunn, Lagonda is the Shawnee Indian name for Buck Creek in Gunn's native Springfield, Ohio. Between 1905 and 1935 Lagonda built increasingly larger and more refined motorcars, culminating with the 4.5-litter, 6-cylinder Lagonda Rapide that was shown at the London Motor Shaw in 1934. The economic climate was difficult then and the Lagonda company was saved by an outside investor: Alan Good assembled a team of engineers and designers led by W.O. Bentley to make what he described as " the best car in the world", using a redesigned Rapide chassis and a new V12 engine. Had the term Supercat been in use at the time, V12 Rapide would have been more than qualified to use it. In many ways it bettered the V12 offerings from Cadillac in the United States, Hispano-Suiza in France and Lagonda's own British archrival, the Rolls-Royce Phantom III.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1937 Bugatti Type 57S Atlantic

1937 Bugatti Type 57S Atlantic
Chassis 57473 is one of the four orignial Bugatti Type 75S Atlantics and the third one built by Bugatti. Originally built for Mr. and Mrs. Jacques Holzschuch of Paris, this car won the Grand Prix d'Honneur at Juan-les-Pins in 1937. After some modifications, thought to be by Figoni, it was acquired by Bugatti collector Rene Chatard. Tragically, he and a friend, Janine Vacheron, were killed and the car was seriously damaged when hit by a train in 1955. The car was sequestered by the railway company and only several years later released to a scrap dealer. Paul-Andre Berson, a Bugatti collector, discovered the reamains in 1965 and set about a rebuild, using the damaged chassis and the right-hand side of the coachwork, but not using many distorted body parts from the left-hand side or the original engine, which he found to be difficult to repair. At the request of the current owner, the remaining original parts have now been reunited with the car by restorer Paul Russell.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1938 Tatra Type 77a Limousine

1938 Tatra Type 77a Limousine
The Czechoslovakian Tatra company built cars from 1897 until 1999 and is the third oldest automobile company after Mercedes-Benz and Peugeot. One of the most futuristic designs of the classis period, the Tatra Type 77 was the world's first series-produced aerodynamic car, and it had a rear-mounted, 3-liter V8 air-cooled engine. First shown on March 5, 1934, in Prague, the Type 77 was like nothing else availabe at that time. In 1935 the model was updated and improved, resulting in the Type 77a with a V8 increased to 3.4 liters. The central headlamp is linked to the steering so that it turns with the car's direction. A total of 255 cars were built between 1933 and 1938. This complete and original car was discovered in Russia in 2000 with its interior and dashboard intact, and it has been recently restored to its original condition.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1939 Delage D8 120 Henri Chapron Cabriolet

1939 Delage D8 120 Henri Chapron Cabriolet
Delage Company founder Louis Delage liked to say, "Gentlemen drive Alfas and you're driven in a Rolls-Royce, but a Delage is something to give one's mistress." This late model Delage D8-120 has a 4.3-liter, eight-cylinder engine on the short wheelbase Delahaye 135 chassis. The Delage and Delahaye companies had merged in 1935 and therefore shared many components. Their chassis attracted the latest styles of coachwork by all of the top European Carrossiers, including Figoni, Franay, Labourdette and Chapron, which designed and built this cabriolet. They were extremely expensive in their day, selling for over 105,000 French Francs. This very original car was bought by its current owner in 1995 and this is its first time at Pebble Beach.
Source: classiccarslog.com




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