Classic Cars' Museum: Class N-1 Jaguar 75th Anniversary



Concours d'Elegance 2010: Class N-1 Jaguar 75th Anniversary





1966 Jaguar XJ13 Prototype

1966 Jaguar XJ13 Prototype
There was only one Jaguar XJ13 built by Jaguar in the 1960s. Built as a potential Le Mans contender, it never made it to any race. By the time XJ13 was completed, it had become obsolete against new cars from Ferrari and the Ford GT40 as well as the Porsch 917. Designed by Malcolm Sayer, who had been responsible for the C-type and D-type, it had a 502 bhp, 5-liter V12 wngine. When completed, it was driven by David Hobbs, who established a lap record of over 161 mph at the MIRA teat track. Having nowhere else to go the XJ13 was mothballed until 1971 when it was driven by Chief Test Driver, Norman Dewis at MIRA. Demonstrating the car at well over 140 mph, a wheel gave away and the car was completely wrecked. Norman walked away after having crouched under the scuttle. It was rebuilt by Jaguar and is part of the Jaguar Heritage Collection in Coventry, England.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1961 Jaguar E-type Fixed Head Coupe

1961 Jaguar E-type Fixed Head Coupe
One of the world's greatest and most popular sports cars is the Jaguar E-type, or XKE. This is the car that started the American love affair with the XKE; it is the 1961 New York Auto Show coupe. Alongside three other E-types, this became the most photographed car of the year. Standing beside it initially was model Marilyn Hanold - although she was urged to move out of the way by the photographers! Chassis 995004 differd slightly from the later production cars, although the overall design remained largely unchanged until its replacement in 1975. After its New York debut it went to Jaguar's West Coast distributor, then to Judy MacHarg until 1989. The current owner bought it in 1996 and reunited the coupe with his other E-type, the 1961 New York Auto Show readster. The Jaguar's timeless elegance was recognized nin 1008 when the E-type Coupe was ranked in the Daily Telegraph list of 100 Beautiful Cars.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1955 Jaguar XKD Race

1955 Jaguar XKD Race
This is the first of the six longnose D-type Jaguar works team cars from 1956. This car (XKD601) was built with lightweight panels and fuel injection and first at Goodwood in February 1956. After a few non-finishes at Sebring and the Nurburgring Mike Hawthorn and Paul Frere came in second at the 12 Hour race at Reimes. Duncan Hamilton bought the car from Jaguar at the end of 1956, but it was prepared by the Jaguar works for Le Mans in 1957 (it had the 3.8 liter carburetor engine) and it finished in sixth place. A 3-litre engine was fitted for the 1958 Le Mans race when it was driven by Hamilton and Ivor Bueb. Sadly the car crashed when it was in second place with only four hours to go to the finish. Rebuilt by Jaguar, it was sold to private owners and is now restored to its 1956 specification.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1955 Jaguar D-type

1955 Jaguar D-type
The success of the Jaguar C-type prompted Jaguar to focus on its next sports car, and plans for a monocoque cports car were put into place in 1954. A magnesium alloy frame with alloy panels was designed by aerodynamicist Malcolm Sayer, and the XK engine was redesigned by Walter Hassan and Bill Heynes. A long nose D-type won Le Mans in 1955 driven by Mike Hawthorn and Ivor Bueb. This car (shassis XKD504) was the Jaguar team's spare car at Le Mans that year. For the rest of 1955 and 1956 it was used to test a new fuel injection system and it appeared at several European circuits including the Nurburgring and Silverstone. After Jaguar pulled out of direct involvement in racing in 1955 it was sold to the Ecurie Ecosse team which ran a team of D-types from 1956 to 1960. This car was entered by Ecurie Ecosse at Le Mans and Sebring in 1958. It is shown with its 1958 full-width screen and Ecurie Ecosse colors.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1953 Jaguar XK120 SE Roadster

1953 Jaguar XK120 SE Roadster
This Jaguar XK120 SE Roadster has been in the same family since it was new. First delivered to Jaguar distributor Charles Hoffman of New York City, it has been driven less than 23,000 miles. It has been meticulously maintained by the Morton family throughout this time. The SE in the name stands for it Special Equipment, which includes wire wheels, a dual exhaust and the sportier C-Type head. The Jaguar XK120 was first announced in 1948 at the London Motor Show. Jaguar had originally decided to sell only limited number of these 120 mph sports cars with an aluminum body but they were overwhelmed with orders for the car. After 242 lightweight cars had been built, production switched to steel for the remainder of the 12,000 XK120s produced before 1954. The XK120 began the long line of XK sports cars that made Jaguar a household name. Successes on the race track led to dominance in the sale rooms all over the world, nowhere more so than in the United States.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1952 Jaguar C-type

1952 Jaguar C-type
Jaguar started work on the racing prototype that would bring so much success to the company in late 1950 after an XK120C nearly won the 24 Hours of Le Mans that year. The Jaguar XK120C, where the C stood for competition, quickly became known as the Jaguar C-type. They were the sports car to have in the early 1950s; they were relatively cheap and simple to drive. Many were sold to private race drivers all over the world. This car (chassis 007) was the first C-Type delivered to United States in 1952. Its first owner was Jaguar dealer Charles Hornburg in Beverly Hills. It went straight to Elkhart Lake to be driven by Phil Hill, who narrowly beat the second place Ferrari of Phil Walters in the Sheldon Cup race. Hill drove the car for the rest of the season. After many racing seasons and several owners, it was restored in 1986 by Jaguar specialist Terry Larson.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1938 Jaguar SS100 Roadster

1938 Jaguar SS100 Roadster
The range of sports cars built by the company that became SS Cars and then Jaguar evolved from the SS90 of 1935, to the SS100 2.5-liter of 1935 and finally to the SS100 3.5 liter of 1938. The exterior shape of these cars remained virtually unchanged, but many changes occurred under the simple, but effective body. These were the first S.S. cars to be called Jaguar. William Lyons said that the name represented the deline grace and elegance, power and agility that set this car apart. In 1936 Tommy Wisdom won the Alpine Trials in an SS100 and went to race very successfully at Brooklands and Shelsley Walsh. Three SS100s won the team prize at the RAC Rally in 1937. When SS100 production was cut short by the Second World War in 1939 just 190 of the SS100 2.5-liter cars and 118 of the 3.5-liter variant had been constructed.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1935 S.S. 1 Drop Head Coupe

1935 S.S. 1 Drop Head Coupe
The first S.S.1 was introduced to the public at the London Olympia Motor Show in 1931 as the S.S. 1 Close-Coupled Coupe, and it could justifiable be called the first car that was completely designed by William Lyons. After a revised design in 1933, Lyons came up with a beautiful 1934 model range with a much improved radiator design and a new saloon. He also showed this Drop Head Coupe designed and an Airline Coupe. With the lower roofline, long bonnet and sporty design they looked much more expensive than they really were, establishing a tradition that Jaguar was to maintain for many years.
Source: classiccarslog.com




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