Classic Cars' Museum: Class O-1 Postwar Sports



Concours d'Elegance 2010: Class O-1 Postwar Sports





1953 Siata 208S Motto Spider

1953 Siata 208S Motto Spider
Founded in 1926 by amateur racing driver Giorgio Ambrosini, Siata-short for Societa Italiana Applicazione Transformazone Automobilistiche-began by providing tuning equipment for various Italian sports cars, mainly Fiats. The first Siata production car was the Amica, a two-seat spyder that won the 1948 Italian Racing Championship. Siata used the Fiat-built 2-liter V-8 as the basis for its best-known creation, the 208S, introduced at the 1952 Geneva Auto Salon. This car (chassis BS519) is one of the 37 Spyders built. It was sold by the West Coast Siata distributor Ernie McAfee to David Ballard of Los Altos, California. He kept the car until 1989, covering a mere 10,000 miles. It was sold to Scott Borman, who restored the car and showed it at the 1991 Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance, winning First in Class. After two more owners it was acquired by its current owner who has completed a number of refinements to bring the car to as-new condition.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1951 Talbot T26 Stabilimenti Farina Grand Sport

1951 Talbot T26 Stabilimenti Farina Grand Sport
This Talbot Lago T26 Grand Sport (chassis 110160) was built in 1951 for de Almeida Araujo, the Portuguese Talbot agent and shown at the 1951 Paris Auto Salon. Almost all Talbot Lago Grand Sports were bodied by French coachbuilders but this car was the first to be designed and built by an Italian firm. Stabilimenti Industriali Giovanni Farina, older brother of Battista "Pinin" Farina. At an early age Pinin learned the trade in his brother's company and eventually started his own Carrozzeria, Pinin Farina, eventually overtaking brother Giovanni's company. Stabilimenti Farina closed in 1953. The first 4.5-liter Talbot T26 road car was launched in 1947 and race versions swiftly followed, the most successful being the T26C Grand Prix car and the Dugarreau-designed T26 Barchetta. Around 30 examples of the T26 Grand Sport were built by Anthony Lago's Talbot company.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1952 Abarth 1500 Biposto Berton B.A.T I

1952 Abarth 1500 Biposto Berton B.A.T I
Designed by Franco Scaglione, Nuccio Bertone and Carol Abarth as a one-off for the 1952 Turin Motor Show, this Fiat 1500 Abarth appeared on the Fiat stand. It is among the earliest, if not the first, of the Fiat-based Abarths. After working on this car Bertone went on to design the famous Alfa Romeos, B.A.T. 5, 7 and 9, between 1953 and 1955. This car therefore has a claim on the title of B.A.T. I. it was discovered in a barn in New England, where it had been in storage since the 1970s. Its owner had been given the car in 1953 by Packard President James Nance, who had purchased the car at the Turin Auto Show with the idea of studying it for design ideas for Packard's own cars. This Bertone-bodied Abarth 1500 Biposto coupe is one of the most important barn finds in recent motoring histroy. Fifty years after the Turin show, it was bought by its current owner who undertook its restoration.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1954 Siata 208SC Balbo Coupe

1954 Siata 208SC Balbo Coupe
The Siata 208 was launched to much critical acclaim late in 1952. This Siata 208SC uses Fiat's 70-degree V8 (Otto vu) engine. Around sixty Siata chassis were produced in 1953 and 1954 and they received at least six different body styles. The most common of these are the 208S for the open cars and the 208SC for these slightly larger coupes. The Carrozzeria Motto-built Spyder body was a popular choice with its lightweight and nimble chassis. It is not known who designed this very attractive coupe body but it was either Franco Scaglione or Giovanni Michelotti. The first coachbuilder for these coupes was Stabilimenti Farina but they folded after just six examples were produced. A further nine coupes were constructed along the same lines by the small coachbuilder, Carrozzeria Balbo in Turin. Chassis CS061 was bought by its current owner in 2004.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1956 Talbot-Lago T14 LS

1956 Talbot-Lago T14 LS "Special Light Weight" Coupe
In 1935, Italian Antonio Lago acquired the venerable French Talbot Company, rechristening it Talbot-Lago. Lago believed that winning races sold a lot of cars and through to the end of the company in 1959, Lago's cars raced and won, including a 1-2 victory at Le Mans in 1950. Following the racing success of the Talbot, the T14, at the Paris Auto Salon in 1955. It had a 2.5-liter twin-cam 4 cylinder engine. Less than twenty T14s were built and of these only a handfull were built to this lightweight specification. The Special featured here has aluminum doors, hood and boot lid, Borrani wheels, large Weber carburetors and high-lift camshafts to enhance its grand-touring performance. This example was the Talbot-Lago factory demonstrator and was owned by a friend of the Talbot Grand Prix driver and Le Mans winner, Louis Rosier.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1954 Aston Martin DB2/4 Graber Drophead Coupe

1954 Aston Martin DB2/4 Graber Drophead Coupe
Hermann Graber started as a coachbuilder in Wichtrach near Bern in Switzerland. During the 1930s Graber became world famous for his beautiful convertible and coupe body designs and for his perfect craftmanship. A total of six Aston Martin chassis received Graber Drophead bodies. This Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk I (chassis LML 562) is the one and only DB2/4 chassis bodied by Graber. The car stayed hidden in its native Switzerland for its entire life until being brought to the United States a few years ago to undergo a total ground-up restoration. It still bears the tag of the original selling dealer, Limmat Garage in Bern, a concern that is still in business today. Introduced to the public at the London Motor Show in 1953, around 102 DB 2/4s Drophead Coupes were bulit by Aston Martin between 1953 and 1955. It has the 2.6 litre VB6E Vantage engine from the earlier DB2 which produced 125bhp.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1953 Fiat Stanguellini Bertone Berlinetta

1953 Fiat Stanguellini Bertone Berlinetta
This is a Scaglione-designed, Bertone-built one-off prototype that rests on a Fiat chassis with a Stanguellini 1100 cc engine. It was proposed that a limited run of these Fiat Stanguellinis would be built, but only two were ever completed. The Stanguellinis company was famous in the 1950s and '60s for building fast little sports cars based on Fiat Mechanics. Built for the Paris and New York Auto Shows in 1954, the little coupe has many similar features to the three Alfa Romeo B.A.T. series of prototypes. The first owner of this car was Briggs Cunningham, who bought the car for his wife Laura after the New York Auto Show. It then passed to Indianapolis 500 driver Luciano Tonino who gave it to his son Alciente as a wedding gift in 1955. He owned the car until 2006. Its current owner has had the car restored and this is its first outing at any major concours.
Source: classiccarslog.com




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