Classic Cars' Museum: Class U Hot Rods: Lakesters and Bonneville Racers



Concours d'Elegance 2010: Class U Hot Rods: Lakesters and Bonneville Racers





1952 So-Cal Speed Shop Streamliner

1952 So-Cal Speed Shop Streamliner
This is one of the original Belly Tank Specials made from the wing tank of a P-38 Lightning. These could be bought after WWII from the U.S. government for $35! It was built by Alex Xydias, the owner of the So-Cal Speed Shop and ran at Bonneville in 1951. It started with a 156-cubic-inch falthead V8, but the engine was swapped twice and it ended up with a 296-cubic-inch Mercury unit, with which it set a two-way time of 195.77 mph and a one-way speed of 198.34 mph. The So-Cal Special's 198.34 mph run is still the fastest one-way speed that a non-blown flathead had ever run.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1952 Chet Herbert

1952 Chet Herbert "Beast III" Streamliner
This streamliner was the astest single-engined car in America in 1952. It ran at Bonneville driven by Art Chrisman and achieved an incredible 238.095 mph. When it appeared at Bonneville that year it caused a sensation. It was designed by Chet Herbert with the aid of the Cal Tech wind tunnel and a 1/10th scale model, the first time wind tunnels had been used for this purpose in the United States. Shapel Engineering Company in Los Angeles built the full size car. It has a 331-cubic-inch Chrysler Hemi and 18-inch Halibrand magnesium wheel. In 1953 it was re-engined with a 425-cubic-inch GMC diesel engine and was driven by Herbert and Dana Fuller to two additional world records. In 1955 the car was put away in a dry storage facility in California until it was located by Dave Crouse in 2009. Its current owner has had the car restored to its original 1952 specification.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1950 Eddie Miller Streamliner

1950 Eddie Miller Streamliner
Eddie Miller built this Pontiac-engined Class B Lakester Streamliner in 1950. It has a 1949 Pontiac 6 248-cubic-inch engine with a Miller head and manifold, Iskinderian cam and Miller ignition. It achieved a top speed of 146.341 mph at the Bonneville Salt Flats in 1950. The frame is built of 2-inch steel tubing and the wheels are from a 1929 Hupmobile. The Streamliner was featured on the cover of Hot Rod magazine in August 1950. Its current owner bought the car in 1979.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1940 Ralph Schenck Streamliner

1940 Ralph Schenck Streamliner
Ralph Schenck had raced a roadster at the dry lakes in the 1930s, and in 1939 he decided to build a streamliner. He designed the body (reminiscent of the Harry Miller Submarine car) and built the chassis and frame while Joaquin Grosso formed the aluminum body panels. A 183-cubic-inch Chevrolet block with an Oldsmobile head was fitted with Ford crankshaft and rods and a Winfield cam. It made its debut at Harper Dry Lake on May 19, 1940, and achieved a top speed of 118.57 mph. After many runs, the car was sold in 1945. The car's body was damaged in the runs and was thrown away. The car itself was dismantled and the chassis and engine separated but they were both kept safe by Duane Steele. The current owner began its restoration in the 1970s, using many original plans and photographs from Schenck. The car is shown here as it was when it made its first dry lakes appearance.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1929 Williams Brothers Ford Roadster

1929 Williams Brothers Ford Roadster
This Ford Roadster won many first place trophies at the El Mirage dry lake in California. The car was built by four brothers - Gerald, Gerb, Monte and Ron Williams - in 1949. In 1954 they decided to fit a new Dodge Hemi engine with overhead valves and try their luch at the Class B Roadster speed records at Bonnevill. In their first attempt they broke the best time by over 12 mph and later took the B Roadster calss at the Santa Maria Drag Strip in 1955. After the NHRA fuel ban later that year the Williams brothers decided to put their winning car away and it remained in storage in Ventura, California, until 2006 when it was sold to its current owner. The car's bodywork has been hightly refreshed and its engine, brakes and transmission have been brought back to racing specification - and now the car looks much as it did back in 1955.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1927 Jim Khougaz Ford Roadster

1927 Jim Khougaz Ford Roadster
Jim Khougaz turned 212.76 mph in this sevlte D-Modified Roadster at Bonneville in 1957. The rear-mounted engine was a bored and stroked, 467-cid Chrysler Firepower Hemi with eight carburetors on a Crower U-Fab intake. It developed 514-bhp on nitro-methane at 5700 rpm. The space frame, which Hot Rod Magazine said "would do credit to an indy car," was a beautifully handmade tubular affair with a built-in roll bar. After turning 207.85 mph in 1958, Khougaz broke an axle and the car flipped over; Khougaz received a few arm burns, but survived to tell the tale. After the accident the car was stored for decades, complete with its eight carburetors stuffed with salt from the Bonneville rollover. The roadster has now been restored to its former glory by Jim Busby's shop in Laguna Beach.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1932 Crawford-stoner Ford Roadster

1932 Crawford-stoner Ford Roadster
This car was the first Hot Rod to gain public notoriety after it was featured in the September 1947 edition of Look Magazine. It had been built up by Road Runner members, Jerry Stroner and Ken Crawdord. The original Ford Roadster body was removed and channeled, the external handles were filled, and all external hinges and bumps were faired in. A custom hood was built and a new tonneau was added for added streamlining. Starting with a war surplus block, the displacement of the engine was increased to 276 cubic inches and it was completely modified to gain every ounce of power available. The roadster was selected as one of the ten most outstanding Southern California Timing Association cars ever built. When it was finished it was one of the most famous cars among the Road Runners Car Club of California.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1925 Chevrolet Spurgin-Giovanine Roadster

1925 Chevrolet Spurgin-Giovanine Roadster
The Spurgin-Giovanine Roadster was built in 1939 by Chuck Spurgin and first raced in 1940. It has a 4-cylinder Chevrolet engine with a 3-port Oldsmobile head. During its long life as a racer, it has been to the dry lakes and the Bonneville salt flats and it has grag-raced as well. This roadster established an unmatched historic record as the Class A roadster in the 1948 SCTA race season, breaking every world record in its class at every SCTA race meeting. It continued to be campaigned until its last race in 1957 at the Lion's Drag Strip in Long Beach. The Spurgin Roadster was acquired in 2004 by Ernie Nagamatsu, a "dentist by trade but a racer at heart" and the owner and seasoned campaigner of the famous Old Yeller II race car, and he has carefullt restored this roadster to its original condition.
Source: classiccarslog.com




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