Classic Cars' Museum: Class V Open Wheel Race Cars



Concours d'Elegance 2010: Class V Open Wheel Race Cars





1933 Maserati 8CM

1933 Maserati 8CM
The normally aspirated 3-liter 8C Maserati was introduced in 1932, but by 1933 the Maserati brothers wanted more power for their racing cars. The 1933 3-liter 8CM Grand Prix cars had an improved 8-cylinder, supercharged engine, producing around 280 bhp. Eighteen of these cars were built by the Italian company, and this is one of six that survive. It has retained nearly all of its original body panels. Most 8CM Source: classiccarslog.com





1932 Alfa Romeo Tipo B

1932 Alfa Romeo Tipo B
The Alfa Romeo Tipo B or P3 Monoposto was the first genuine single-seat racing car in Grand Prix racing and it dominated the competition in the 1932 season, winning almost at will. Its first appearance came at the Italian GP at Monza on June 5. Chassis 50002 joined the Scuderia Ferrari-ran Alfa team in 1934 before being sold to Count De Villapadierni in Spain and later to Frank Griswold in San Francisco. After running in the 1939 and 1940 Indianapoliss 500 and coming in first at the New York World's Fair in 1940, the car was sold to Tommy Lee in Los Angeles. Entered as the "Don Lee Special" at the 1946 and 1947 Indy 500 it was driven by Hal Cole. Don Lee, Tommy's father, was the most successful Cadillac dealer on the West Coast. In the 1950s this car spent time in Audtralia, then it returned to the United States in the care of collector David Uihlein of Wisconsin. The car was pretty much as you see it here; it has never been restored and bears the scars of its many years of racing all over the world.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1935 Rigling Chassis

1935 Rigling Chassis "Pirrung Special"
This car was originally owned by Gil Pirrung. It is powered by a 220-cubic-inch 4-cylinder Miller with twin Winfield carburetors. It also has Miller running gear throughout the chassis. The first time this car raced was at Mine's Field in Los Angeles on December 23, 1934. George "Doc" McKenzie drove the car in the race and was leading when he ran out of fuel in the closing laps. The car was then inspected, repainted and plated in preparation for the 1935 Indianapolis 500. It still retains most of the original paint from that 1935 race. It was driven by "Doc" McKenzie, with Billy Devore riding mechanic to a ninth place finish. It completed all 200 laps and averaged over 100mph. On a side note, the other car in Pirring's team was driven by Wilbur Shaw to a second place finish to Kelly Petillo.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1913 Isotta Fraschini Tipo IM

1913 Isotta Fraschini Tipo IM
The Isotta-Fraschini was named after its founders Cesare Isotta and Vincenzo Fraschini on January 27, 1900. Before building their first motocar in 1904, Isotta and Fraschini had assembled Renaults. The first Isotta-Fraschini had four-cylinder, 24 hp engine and was driven by Vincenzo in several races. A 17.2-litre car was entered in the Coppa Florio in 1905, and bigger and more powerful cars followed. Isotta-Fraschnin built three of these Tipo IM models for Indianapolis in 1913 and 1914. After the 1914 race this car was put away until it was found in the 1950s by Whitney Snyder and restoed. Isotta-Fraschini racing cars were driven by both Enzo Ferrari and Alfieri Maserati before they started their own car companies.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1927 Bugatti

1927 Bugatti
This Bugatti Type 35C (chassis 4889) is one of nine Type 35s built by the Bugatti factory in Molsheim in April 1927. It was entered by Ettore Bugatti along with two other Type 35Cs in the 1927 San Sebastian Grand Prix in Spain. The drivers were Emilio Materassi, Count Caberto Conelli and Andre Dubonnet. After its early race career the car remained in Spain and during the Spanish Civil War its owner bricked it up to keep in from being confiscated. After being lightly renovated, it came to the United States in 1961. It formed part of the collection of Bugatti enthusiast Dick Upshur before it was acquied by its current owner in 2006. This car is widely regarded as one of the most significant and original Type 35Cs in the world. The Type 35 Bugatti was one of the most successful cars ever built by Bugatti, winning over 1,950 races between 1942 and the mid 1930s. Of all the Type 35 variants, only fifty Type 35Cs were built.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1919 Miller T.N.T.

1919 Miller T.N.T.
Harry A. Miller was involved in a number of automotive first between 1900 and 1910. He rode as a riding mechanic in 1908 in the Vanderbilt Cup races on Long Island but this was his first and last venture in the cockpit of race car due to disappointing results. He returned to engine design in the mid-1910s. In 1917 he designed a complete race car for Barney Oldfield. Called the Golden Submarine, it was an enclosed aerodynamic single seater with a high revving engine that went to 4,000 rpm-most unusual for a period when huge capacity, low revving engines were norm. This 8-cylinder Miller TNT was designed as a race car and as a sports model by a design team consisting of Miller, Fred Offenhauser and Leo Goossen. Harry Miller-built cars went on to dominate American oval racing for decades, winning a total of fifteen Indy 500s from 1921 to 1941.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1927 Miller

1927 Miller
The Miller "Derby" is a front-wheel-drive car built by Harry Miller. It has a 1.5-liter supercharge twin-cam engine. After appearing at sthe Indianapolis 500 in 1928 and 1929, the car was bought by British race driver Douglas Hawkes for his wife, Gwenda Hawkes-Stewart. She drove the car at Montlhery in 1930 and set many records with the car over the next five years. In 1934 she set a record of 147.79 mph at Montlhery in France. In 1935 she broke the Class E and Ladies Race record at Brookland that has vener been broken. After she sold the car, the engine was bought by a newspaper owner in Northern Ireland and then by the Indianapolis Speedway Museum. The rest of the car had remained in England and now the car has been reunited and restored to its former glory by its current owner, who bought the car in 1993.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1920 Ballot 3LR

1920 Ballot 3LR
Gabriel Ernest Maurice Ballot started building industrial engines in Paris in 1908 and they soon began to appear in cars. Customers included the French marques Delage and Barre. World War I saw the business flourish as his company produced engines for the French government. His road and race car company reappeared in 1919. Rene Thomas drove this particular model, the Ballot 3LR race car (chassis 1007), at the Indianapolis 500 in 1920 and finished in second place. A Ballot 3LR driven by Jules Goux won the first Italian Grand Prix in 1921 held on a road circuit near Brescia. American driver, Ralph DePalma came in second in the French Grand Prix at Le Mans driving a Ballot 3LR in that same year. The Ballot 3LR has an 8-culinder, 3-liter overhead valve engine. Ballots were always expensive, well made cars, but in the late 1920s the market for such cars shrunk dramatically and they were taken over by Hispano-Suiza in 1931.
Source: classiccarslog.com




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