Classic Cars' Museum: Class C-1 American Classis Open



Concours d'Elegance 2010: Class C-1 American Classis Open





1932 Marmon Sixteen LeBaron Convertible Coupe

1932 Marmon Sixteen LeBaron Convertible Coupe
Prior to the introduction of the Sixteen in mid-1931, Marmon had a fine reputation as a quality builder of 6- and 8-cylinder cars. Introduced in 1929, the Roosevelt model succeeded in raising Marmon's annual sales from 14,470 cars in 1928 to over 22,000 units in its first year of production. Founder Colonel Howard Marmon spent five years developing the most advanced V16 engine in the industry - an all-aluminum powerplant with overhead vales, delivering 490.8 cubic inches of silky torque. All of the bare chassis for the cars were tested at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway before being sent to Detroit to be bodied by LeBaron. The Marmon Sixteen was Howard Marmon's final production effort as difficult financial times took their toll; this magnificant example is one of just 390 built.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1933 Chrysler Imperial Custom Lebaron Phaeton

1933 Chrysler Imperial Custom Lebaron Phaeton
Many feel Chrysler's finest hour was its Custom Imperial lineup built from 1931 through 1933. A Chrysler Imperial with LeBaron coachwork was the height of 1930s luxury and style. This magnificant open example reportedly belonged to Ralph Roberts, LeBaron's chief designer. In total, Chrysler ordered 50 Phaeton bodies from LeBaron in 1932. Fourteen were initially shipped, although a few are believed to have been returned to the factory for updating with 1933 sheet metal and trim. Other than these updates, 36 of the 50 cars were originally built as 1933 models, and today, it is estimated that just 17 remain, including a handfull of restored examples. Powered by a 385-cubic-inch straight-8 these Chryslers were noted for their lively preformance.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1932 Nash Advanced Eight Convertible Sedan

1932 Nash Advanced Eight Convertible Sedan
Like many manufacturers faced with plunging sales after the 1929 crash, Nash produced a series of remarkably luxurious cars in an effort to add prestige and promote their brand. The 1930 to 1934 Nash twin-ignition Advanced Eights were the largest Nashes in a period of sumptuous, besutiful styling and boasted lots of special deatures. This magnificant example was one of probably only a handful built. Powered by a 322-cubic-inch straight-8 engine and fitted with true custom coachwork, this beauty gave its original owner a unique luxury car experience.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1929 Cord L-29 Cabriolet

1929 Cord L-29 Cabriolet
Front wheel drive was virtually unheard of when E.L. Cord introduced his namesake car in 1929. Cords were noted for their innovative technology and streamlinged design. E.L. Cord had a mission to build truly different, innovative cars, believing they would also sell well and turn a healthy profit. The unique engine mounting system and lack of a rear wheel driveline alloed the dramatically lower body styling than was the norm for the era and resulted in a series of cars as distinctive in their style as in their mechanics. Powered by the 4,934 cc, 125 hp Lycoming inline 8-cylinder engine from the Auburn 120, the crankshaft came out through the front of the block with the front-mounted flywheel linked to a three-speed transmission. Over 4000 examples of the L-29 were built before production ceased in 1932.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1930 Auburn 125 Cabriolet

1930 Auburn 125 Cabriolet
Industrialist E.L. Cord took over the sleepy Auburn Automobile Company in the mid-1920s and invigorated its product with lively performance, creative use of color, and trend-setting styling. The design of the 8-125 remained virtually unchanged from its inception in 1925 as the 8-88. It was considered especially chic, sporting a design way beyond its time. The basic body was offered as a Phaeton, Sedan and Sports Sedan as well as this Cabriolet. Powered by a spirited 125 hp Lycoming straight-8 engine and priced hundreds of below similar offerings, the Auburn was a huge success. It was one of the few marques to report sales gains following the 1929 Stock Market crash.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1930 Cadillac 452 Fleetwood Sport Phaeton

1930 Cadillac 452 Fleetwood Sport Phaeton
Cadillac stunned the auto industry with its V-16 series, including in mid-1930. Cardillac's engineers were the first to get a V-16 engine ready for sale to the public. The engine displaced 452 cubic inches (or just over 7.4 liters)., produced 175 hp and had torque in abundance. Dispite being the most expensive Cadliiac ever and despite being introduced during the clouded times of the Great Depression. 3,250 examples were sold in the 1930-31 series, catapulting the Cadillac marque toward alomost total ownership of the U.S. luxury maker. This simply adorned sport Phaeton model was purchased by the present owner while he was still in high school - and he drove it to his prom!
Source: classiccarslog.com





1937 Cord 812 SC Convertible Coupe

1937 Cord 812 SC Convertible Coupe
Manufacturing and business genius E.L. Cord put his own name on the automobile he wished to represent his flair for noth design and mechanical innovation. The second series Cords, built in 1936 and 1937, bosted Cord's unique and sophisticated front-wheel-drive system. the 1937 Cord 812 SCs were little changed except for the supercharger option, which brought horsepower up to 190 and gave the car one of the best power-to-weight ratios in the market. Approximately 195, some sources claim 225, of the attractive convertible coupes were built in 1936 and 1937. About 64 of the 1937 convertible coupes were supercharged. This supercharged example offered the lucky purchaser a true sports car with remarkable front wheel drive, making it possble the best handling car of its era.
Source: classiccarslog.com





1931 Studebaker President Series 80 Four Seasons Roadster

1931 Studebaker President Series 80 Four Seasons Roadster
Henry and Clem Studebaker built covered wagons in South Bend, Indiana, beginning in 1952, and within two decades, Studebaker was the largest horse-drawn vehicle manufacturer in the world. The first Studebaker cars, built in 1902, were electric. A range of gas-powered motorcars followed in 1904, and the company established an enviable reputation for quality and reliability. In 1927, the Studebaker Company moved up-market into the luxury car segment with their President model line. Smartly two-tone to accentuate its flowwing lines, the Four Seasons Roadster was the ultimate sporty expression of Studebaker's climb into the luxury car market. like so many manufactures, they hoped the addition of a luxury line would slaes of their entire lineup as the Great Depression deepened. this rate car is a very snappy performer powered by a 337-cubie-inch straight-8 engine.
Source: classiccarslog.com




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